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With the COVID-19 vaccine still young, it is normal to have questions about the risks and benefits of getting the vaccine. The most important thing is to do your research and get the facts! We suggest speaking with a trusted health care provider so they can accurately answer all of your questions. You can also read information from a reliable medical source. Let’s look at the risks and benefits of getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccine Background Information Vaccines were created to help prevent diseases and fight viruses. They are thoroughly and carefully tested before they are approved for use. Diverse groups of people have felt a cultural bias when it comes to the benefits of medicine and vaccines, which is why tens of thousands of individuals from diverse backgrounds were tested for the COVID-19 vaccine to ensure its effectiveness across all communities. The COVID-19 vaccine has no preservatives, pork products, gelatin, egg, or live COVID-19 virus. Medical researchers continuously monitor the vaccine for its safety, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review this safety data before they authorize its official use. The Risks As with any medication or vaccine, there are potential side effects that can be considered risks. These effects can vary depending on how your body reacts. Some potential side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are: Pain Swelling Redness (at the location where the shot was administered) Headaches Achiness Tiredness Low-grade fevers In addition to the above side effects, some more severe side effects have included: Allergic reactions: This is a rare side effect that typically will occur within 15 to 30 minutes of being vaccinated. Blood Clotting: The risk is very low, but has occurred in some individuals after receiving the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. Most cases were identified with women who are younger than 50 years old. Myocarditis and Pericarditis: Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle and Pericarditis is inflammation of the lining outside of the heart. Both of these have been seen in rare occurrences after the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine....

Turning Point is seeking quality people who want to be part of an organization committed to making a difference in our community. See job descriptions for current open positions in the links below. Full Time Cook 2022 Linkage Coordinator 2022 Part-time Cook 2022 Transportation Driver 2022 If you are interested in one of these positions, click here for an application: 2022 APPLICATION OF EMPLOYMENT Please complete the application and return it with a resume to Dorian.Bowlds@ourturningpoint.org. Or you can drop off the application and resume at Turning Point (1500 Golden Valley Road, Minneapolis). If you have questions, you can reach the Interim Human Resources Manager Dorian Bowlds at 612-302-4102....

Have you ever had the feeling of being completely overwhelmed, stressed out, worried, or fearful about something? All four of these can lead to anxiety, which can negatively affect your overall health. Anxiety can interfere with your everyday activities, social life, relationships, or work. If you feel like you experience anxiety, there are steps that you can take to help identify and manage it so that it does not become overwhelming. Here are some strategies you can use to help manage anxiety. Identify Trigger Points When experiencing anxiety and creating ways to manage it, one of the first steps you can take is identifying triggers. Discover the reasons as to why you are feeling stressed or anxious. Ask yourself some questions to help determine what areas trigger you: What situations cause me stress? Are there specific actions that increase my anxiety? Do I feel anxious in certain places? Another excellent way to identify or track what triggers your anxiety is to keep a journal. Write down when you are feeling anxious and what caused the anxiety in that moment. Once identify your triggers for anxiety, you can begin developing and implementing strategies to help you manage it when these situations arise. Implement Healthy Lifestyle Choices An effective way to manage anxiety is to implement healthy lifestyle choices. There are various opportunities within your lifestyle that you can change or adjust to help with anxiety, such as: Stay Active: Physical activity is a powerful stress reducer. Get into a routine of implementing daily physical activities to help improve your mood and keep you healthy. Eat Healthy: A healthy eating plan can help reduce anxiety levels. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables as well as other healthy food options. Get Rest: Make sure you get enough rest daily and stay consistent with your wake-up times. Avoid These Items: To help manage and reduce anxiety, avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, smoking, and limit your caffeine intake. These substances have been known to worsen anxiety. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle and making healthy choices can significantly impact...

Consider these top four reasons for teens to get the vaccine. Teen Vaccine Tip Sheet...

Do you have questions about the Covid-19 vaccine? Check out these answers to frequently asked questions. Vaccine FAQs...

Peter Hayden, PhD, is the co-founder of one of the most influential substance use disorder treatment programs in the country. In 2015, his Minneapolis-based Turning Point facility was identified by the University of Minnesota for its approach to culturally specific treatment for Black patients as an industry-best practice, and in 2021 it received the inaugural National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP) Diversity, Inclusivity and Racial Equity Award. Hayden himself has been celebrated with the Community Legends award from General Mills and the America Honors Recovery award from Johnson Institute. Oh, and that honor Turning Point received from the NAATP last year? After its issuance, the award was promptly named after Hayden. He is, without a doubt, a seminal figure in the addiction and treatment space. But Hayden also isn’t so different from many of the patients who have walked through the doors of Turning Point. As a young Black man who returned to Minneapolis after serving in Vietnam, Hayden soon realized that he had no home, little direction and a drinking problem that increasingly defined his circumstances. A car accident in front of the police station and the alcohol detected on Hayden’s breath made for a short walk to lockup. “This is how God works in my life,” Hayden recalls. After pre-sentencing, Hayden was directed to treatment, and because he was ready to change, he says, the program worked. He embraced the 12 steps, but it wasn’t lost on him that he was always the only person of color in the room. Hayden filed that away, soon learned that the GI Bill would pay for his education, and went on to earn his undergraduate degree from Minnesota, his master’s in public administration (Capella University) and his doctorate in psychology (Richardson University). He has been in recovery ever since. That Hayden is a distinguished example of representation in his field—a sector that only recently has begun to address its awful track record regarding diversity—should go without saying. And yet it deserves special attention. In a space with life-and-death stakes,...